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NEW (May, 2014): Flip through issues of "The Etude" using the "flipbook" interface. I have converted three several issues to "flipbook" format, which allows you to leaf through copies of "The Etude" without losing the character of the original publication's layout. Tell me what you think after flipping through these issues of "The Etude", and read my comments on this process at the newly-minted Szapp.COM:



Accompanying Singers.

The Etude Magazine. September, 1902
It is not easy to give directions for this most rare accomplishment. There are so many sides to it and conditions confronting it that a book could and should be written which would, as far as possible, exhaust the subject. Let us first consider the accompanist, and, because so many more women than men aim to succeed in this field, we will designate her as she.
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The Awakening.

The Etude Magazine. September, 1902
Some awakenings are gradual. The dream of success has not been a troubled dream, but a season of repose interspersed with moments of self-sacrificing effort. The gifts, however, were so abundant that even such efforts gave a respectable harvest of…
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The Technic of Vocal Expression. No. III. Tone-Connection.

The Etude Magazine. September, 1902
The principal varieties of tone-connection in singing may be classified as follows: Legato, Portamento, Marcato, and Staccato. The term Legato is from the Italian legare, to bind, and indicates a tone-connection where the pitch of one tone begins directly at…
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Study in Phrasing. I.

The Etude Magazine. September, 1902
Because of the intimate relations of poetry and vocal music there is much light to be cast from verses upon tunes, and from tunes upon verses. As soon as we begin to set words in order, into feet, lines, and…
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Why Am I So Stupid?

The Etude Magazine. September, 1902
This question was asked me some time ago by a pupil who for years had been singing with a very tightly constricted throat, so much so, that the quality was very harsh and poor, and there was very little power….
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Operatic Voices.

The Etude Magazine. September, 1902
W. J. Henderson clears  up some of the fog of adulation that exists around the present-day opera-singers. He writes in his department of the New York Times: The unthinking worship of the opera-singer has its origin in the supposition that…
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How the Voice Looks.

The Etude Magazine. September, 1902
Prof. E. W. Scripture contributes an article entitled “How the Voice Looks” to a recent number of the Century. Professor Scripture is director of the Psychological Laboratory of Yale University, and if his views are accepted there promises to be…
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Questions and Answers.

The Etude Magazine. September, 1902
The question received relating to accompanying singers was so pertinent to present conditions that I have made an extended allusion to it in the article heading this department. Ida H.—The Baritone, when singing from a treble score, pitches his voice…
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Sir Alexander Campbell Mackenzie and the Royal Academy of Music, London.

Sir Alexander Campbell Mackenzie and the Royal Academy of Music, London. The Etude Magazine. September, 1902
The composer is worse off than any other branch. If he writes the highest and best, he cannot publish, and he must teach or sing low to get a living. The music now published, however, is much better than was the case in the past, and there has been a great awakening and extraordinary change in the last fifteen years.
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Music-Clubs and Their Pitfalls

The Etude Magazine. September, 1902
It can hardly be said that the clubs are getting ready for work, for as yet those who give the most active work and thought to the welfare of these organizations are resting up for the coming season. The growth of the musical-club fad, if so beneficial a function may be termed a fad, is nothing short of remarkable.
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A Belated Letter Addressed to the Convention of the Federation of Musical Clubs by the Editor of Woman’s Work In Music.

The Etude Magazine. May, 1901
Edited by FANNY MORRIS SMITH Once a very good New England woman was heard to thank her Creator that He had placed all the great rivers beside the great towns. This tale, which we heard Emerson relate in a lecture,…
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My Experience.

The Etude Magazine. May, 1901
Music-study classes and analytical lectures of all sorts are almost too common now to be written about, but I would like to relate a pleasant experience I have had in this line, one which bids fair to bear good fruit…
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Musical Literature for Children.

The Etude Magazine. May, 1901
How to interest children in work which will improve them is a subject of no little study, not only to mothers, but to teachers who have the advancement and development of young minds in charge. The responsibility which rests upon…
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Men and Women Teachers.

The Etude Magazine. May, 1901
The subject frequently comes up for discussion as to which makes the best teacher, the man or the woman. The writer will probably be accused of partiality to her own sex if she claims for the woman a knack and…
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More Intelligent Listeners.

The Etude Magazine. May, 1901
Madame Rive-King, one of America’s most notable pianists, was asked her opinion of musical advancement during her concert-career. She said: “I find a very noticeable increase of people who hear intelligently, and an artist senses this intelligence as quickly as…
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National Federation Of Musical Clubs. News of the Federated Clubs. Northern Middle Section.

The Etude Magazine. May, 1901
The Polyhymnia Club, of Saginaw, Mich., will give its last subscription concert early in May, with Joseph Baernstein as soloist. It will be remembered that this is the club that has a May Festival well under way for the 20th…
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Mr. David Bispham on the Study of the English Song.

Mr. David Bispham on the Study of the English Song. The Etude Magazine. May, 1901
This is the first of a series of talks with prominent artists which Mr. William Armstrong, the well-known critic and writer, has obtained for The Etude. The next will be “The Study of the German Song,” by Mme. Schumann-Heink, to be followed by M. Pol Plancon on “The Study of the French Song,” and Mme. Lillian Nordica on “Woman in Music,” particularly addressed to the American girl music student.
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A Short Sketch of Music in America - By JAMES FRANCIS COOKE

A Short Sketch of Music in America - By JAMES FRANCIS COOKE The Etude Magazine. July, 1910
Musical History is really an extremely interesting subject when the matter is presented in a thoroughly understandable manner. The object of the work of which the following is one of forty story lessons is to make the subject of musical history accessible to the beginner and at the same time inviting and inspiring. The work is designed for adults as well as young people, the only distinction being its simplicity and popular style.
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First Prize Essay - The True Value of the Study of Music.

The Etude Magazine. May, 1895
BY BERTRAM C. HENRY. When we engage in anything which demands so great an expenditure of time and money as is needed for the study of music, we are generally anxious to direct our efforts so as to gain the…
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Second Prize Essay - Musicians or Executants, Which?

The Etude Magazine. May, 1895
BY JOHN C. FILLMORE. Shall we make our piano pupils into musicians or shall we make of them only executants? This may seem to many a very absurd question. So it is, from any rational point of view. The prompt…
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Recently Posted Stories for Pianists

Emil Sauer On “Practicing”—Brains As Well As Fingers.

May, 1895
Some valuable hints for piano students were dropped by Herr Emil Sauer the other day in the course of an interview with a Manchester Evening Mail reporter. After recounting the principal incidents in his early career, the distinguished pianist spoke...
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Paderewski and Liszt.

July, 1893
Poland will some day honor Paderewski as it now honors Chopin; but in order to win the great fame and wealth which have fallen to his lot at the early age of thirty-two, he was of course obliged, like Chopin, to leave his native country and seek the great musical centres of the world. Three years ago he played in London to a $50 audience. To-day he often makes $5,000 in two hours, with $7,000 for the high-water mark.
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Thorough Practice. - August, 1891
Praise of a Poor Piano - A Paradox - By Eugenio Pirani - January, 1924
Basic Principles in Pianoforte Playing, Part IV - JOSEF LHEVINNE - January, 1924
Basic Principles in Pianoforte Playing, Part III - Josef Lhévinne - December, 1923
Should Piano Playing Undergo a Radical Reform? - Vladimir de Pachmann - December, 1923
Basic Principles in Pianoforte Playing - Josef Lhévinne - November, 1923
How and What to Practice. - December, 1901
Victorious Liszt. - May, 1902




Recently Posted Stories About Composers

Robert Schumann—Poet.

July, 1893
Poetic, Schumann ever was. Poetic by nature and by culture. Poetic in his work both as composer and as criticiser of the works of others. Poetic in his every thought--every idea. And this poetic spirit he infused into the music of his time, and cultivated it wherever and in whomsoever he found it. And it is for this that I have called him "Robert Schumann--Poet," and it is as poet that I shall here regard him.
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The Humor of Richard Wagner - Written Expressly for The Etude by the Son of the Great Master - SIEGFRIED WAGNER

January, 1924
The underlying trait of my father's character was a lofty artistic earnestness. Along with this, however, there poured forth an illuminating humor and a sunny happiness which, notwithstanding the difficult life situations and the disappointments, rarely resolved into satire or irony.
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The Writing of the “Requiem.” - December, 1898
Notes on the Works of Some Living Composers - July, 1893
Victorious Liszt. - May, 1902
Liszt as a Musical Influence. - May, 1902
Liszt, the Musical Liberal - May, 1902
Liszt as Pianist and Piano-Composer. - May, 1902
Liszt As a Teacher, by Amy Fay - May, 1902
Transcriptions for the Piano by Franz Liszt. - May, 1902




Recently Posted Musicology Content

A Short Sketch of Music in America - By JAMES FRANCIS COOKE

July, 1910
Musical History is really an extremely interesting subject when the matter is presented in a thoroughly understandable manner. The object of the work of which the following is one of forty story lessons is to make the subject of musical history accessible to the beginner and at the same time inviting and inspiring. The work is designed for adults as well as young people, the only distinction being its simplicity and popular style.
Read More »
 

The Polka.

August, 1891
The origin of the polka is being discussed in some of the Parisian journals. The universally popular dance is said to have been invented in 1830, by an Austrian cook, who, finding herself dull in her kitchen, sang and danced...
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The Development of Music in the South During the Past Twenty Years. - July, 1901
Usefulness Of Some Recent Composition - JAROSLAW DE ZIELINSKI. - July, 1897
The Humor of Richard Wagner - Written Expressly for The Etude by the Son of the Great Master - SIEGFRIED WAGNER - January, 1924
Dr. William Mason - The Nestor of American Musicians. - October, 1901
Famous Musical Women of the Past. - November, 1918
Analysis and Logic in Music. - July, 1893
Methods and Customs of the Paris Conservatoire - February, 1910
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, January 27, 1756-December 5, 1791. - December, 1901




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