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Musical Items

A new string quartet by Sinding was played in Berlin recently.
 
Carl Goldmark, the veteran Austrian composer, celebrated his seventy-fifth birthday, May 18th.
 
The Biennial Meeting of the National Federation of Musical Clubs was held at Denver, June 6th-10th.
 
The New York State Music Teachers' Association met at Rochester, June 27th-29th, Jaroslaw de Zielinski, presiding.
 
Two new wonder children are reported from Budapest: Josef Szigeti, eleven years old, and Paul Horowitz, seven years old.
 
Giessen, Germany, with a population of less than 30,000, has voted nearly $100,000 for a town theatre and concert hall.
 
Only Roman Catholic singers are to be employed in the choirs of that church hereafter, according to the Pope's decree.
 
In the preliminary competition for "Roman Prize" at Paris, three women presented themselves among the nineteen candidates.
 
The French Society of Musicians has given six concerts at which compositions by modern French composers were programed.
 
A May Music Festival was given in Chicago, May 26th, under the direction of H. W. Fairbank ; the chorus numbered 1000 voices.
 
Of the entries for copyright at Washington, which numbered 106,577 during the year 1904, 23,740 were for musical compositions.
 
European correspondence says that the Pope intends to have a large hall in the Vatican to be devoted to the performance of oratorio.
 
The Minnesota State Music Teachers' Association met at Winona, June 7th-9th, under the presidency of David F. Colville, of St. Paul.
 
At a sale of old violins in London in May, $4500 was paid for a Guarnerius. The highest price previously paid at an auction was $4300.
 
A citizen of Vienna has presented to the Haydn Museum a large collection of Haydn relics, original manuscripts, letters and household objects.
 
The Twenty-third Annual Convention of the Ohio Music Teachers' Association, John S. Van Cleve, president, was held in Columbus, June 21st-23d.
 
The Easter and Ascension Festival of the Bach Choir of Bethlehem, Pa., was held June lst-3d. The chorus numbered 120 voices, the orchestra 70 players.
 
Mr. T. Brigham Bishop, writer of the war-songs "When Johnnie Comes Marching Home" and "John Brown's Body," died in Philadelphia, May 15th.
 
The violinist Henri Marteau, and the English pianist Frederic Lamond, have given very successful readings of Beethoven's violin sonatas in European cities lately.
 
A special section for music has been opened in the National Library at Florence; it will be in charge of Arnoldo Bonaventure, author of a well-known history of music.
 
The Philharmonic Society, of Warsaw, has been put on safe ground financially by a bequest from a lately deceased music lover, Mieczslaw Wessel, of a fine property valued at $750,000.
 
The contest for the best musical setting of the Ode to Col. W. C. P. Breckenridge, offered in Lexington, Ky., brought in a number of manuscripts which are now in the hands of the judges.
 
A course in "Piano Athletics" is announced to be given in the High School for Music in Mannheim, under the direction of A. Krizek, author of a book bearing the title given to the course.
 
A committee has been formed in Venice to publish hitherto inaccessible manuscripts, in the possession of libraries and societies, of works by Monteverde, Cavalli, Cesti, and the Gabrieli's.
 
The Illinois State Music Teachers' Association held its seventeenth convention at Peoria, June 6th-9th. The officers were Wm. F. Bentley, Galesburg, President; Florence French, Sec.-Treas., Chicago.
 
A revival of one of the mediaeval Mystery Plays is noted in Newcastle, England, when "Resurrexio Domini" was given. The scenery represented the chancel and transepts of an early Norman Church.
 
June is the month for meetings of music teachers' associations. The National Association, and the State organizations of New York, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Minnesota held meetings last month.
 
It looks as if there will be no Cincinnati May Music Festival in 1906, owing to trouble between the Association and the Chorus. It is to be hoped that the differences may be adjusted and work be resumed in the fall.
 
At a sale of old violins in London, in May, a 'cello by Andreas Guarnerius brought $250, a violin by Nicolo Amati, $490, one by Stainer, $300, a 'cello by Gagliano, $475, a violin by Stradivarius, dated 1723, $3750, a violin by Ruggeri, $600.
 
Here is a note of interest on music in Germany. An inventory of 87 typical German workmen's homes was taken in Dresden. Only 11 families owned some kind of musical instrument. Philadelphia would likely make a better showing than that.
 
The "Unione Magistrale Ligure" of Italy, announces an international competition for compositions for the mandolin with guitar or piano accompaniment. For particulars, apply to the Unione Magistrale Ligure, Stradone S. Agosti, No. 29, Genoa, Italy.
 
Mme. Lillian Blauvelt has signed a contract to sing in opera for six years. The first Work in which she is to appear is called "The Rose of the Alhambra," music by Lucius Hosmer; it is described as a romantic comic opera, scenes laid in Seville and Granada.
 
A musical institute will be held at the Waterloo, Iowa, Chautauqua, July 11th-August 2nd. Mr. Scott B. Prowell will have charge of the classes in Violin, Musical Theory, and Pedagogics; Mr. Hiram J. Lloyd, Singing and Conducting; Mr. F. W. Wimberly, Piano and History of Music.
 
The City of Nuremberg has made a grant of $3000 for music to the Philharmonic Orchestra of that city on condition that fifteen concerts be included in its season, at which the price of admission is to be 30 pfennige (8 cents). Two other orchestras receive money for free concerts.
 
The Annual May Music Festival of Yankton, S. D., was given May 21st-23d. The program consisted of an orchestra concert, a vocal recital by Gustaf Holmquist, of Chicago; and Gounod's oratorio, "The Redemption" by the Choral Union. The festival was directed by Mr. Lee N. Dailey.
 
Julius Kniese, director of the Wagner "Style" School at Bayreuth, died April 24th, at Dresden. He was connected with the Wagner movement at Bayreuth for more than twenty years. He was considered an authority on the interpretation of the Wagner dramas and coached many great singers.
 
Mr. Paul David, son of Ferdinand David, the great violinist who was Mendelssohn's ally in Leipzig, celebrated the fortieth anniversary of his professional activity in England, recently. Mr. David is the author of the article bearing on the violin and stringed instruments in Grove's Dictionary.
 
The Michigan State Music Teachers' Association met at Ann Arbor, June 14th-16th, in its nineteenth annual meeting, under the presidency of Mr. Charles S. Joslyn, of Lansing. The program consisted of addresses and recitals by members of the Association and artists from cities outside the State.
 
The Tenth Annual Meeting of the Missouri State Music Teachers' Association was held at Carthage, June 20th-23d. The president for 1904-1905 was Mr. T. Carl Whitmer; secretary, H. E. Rice. Up to the time of going to press The Etude had not received note of the names of the officers for 1905-1906.
 
A syndicate in Lyons, France, has guaranteed a revenue of $2000 a year for fifteen years for a series of symphony concerts in that city. It is the expectation that the choral organization of the "Schola Cantorim" (School for Singers) will join with the orchestra in the production of cantatas and oratorios.
 
A Chamber Music Festival was given at Bonn, May 28th-,June 1st. The Joachim Quartet, the pianists Busoni and Dohnanyi, the Society of Wind Instruments from the Paris Conservatory, and the "Society of Ancient Instruments," also of Paris, assisted. The latter organization played compositions of the 17th and 18th centuries.
 
The Theodore Spiering String Quartet of Chicago has been disbanded, as Mr. Spiering has arranged to go to Europe for a two-years' stay, concertizing and teaching, with Berlin as his headquarters. Some of his advanced pupils will go with him to continue their studies. Mr. William Diestel, of the Quartet, will take charge of a number of Mr. Spiering's pupils in Chicago.
 
Rimsky-Korsakov, the Russian composer, has been deprived of his position in the St. Petersburg Conservatoire to which he has been attached since 1871. He fell into disfavor because of his criticism of the bureaucratic cabal that controls Russia at present. This is a warning that no Government servant may discuss adversely the policy and doings of the Government. It must be remembered that the Conservatoire received a subvention from the Czar and is therefore amenable in discipline to the Government.
 
The ritual of the Holy Orthodox Church of Russia is imposing, the music is superb. The services are sung throughout to old plain chants, the contra bass voices taking the octave below the usual bass, give a rich fundamental bass character, the more striking because organs and other instruments are not used. It is related of Berlioz that when he attended a service in Moscow he was so affected by the singing that he could not stay in the cathedral lest he should shout. This choir consists of fifty men and boys.
 
The Georgia Music Teachers' Association met at the Brenau College Conservatory, Gainesville, Ga., under the presidency of Mr. J. D. MacLean, of Decatur. As the session was a joint one with the Southern Music Teachers' Association the programs were similar, with the exception of a recital of compositions by Dr. J. Lewis Browne, of Atlanta, and a general concert in which Mr. Charles Sheldon, Jr., Mr. R. D. Armour, and Mrs. W. L. Wilson, took part. The officers for 1905-1906 are August Geiger, Gainesville, Pres.; Miss M. Billingslea, Covington, V.-Pres.; Mrs. M. R. McClure, College Park, Sec.; Chas. Sheldon, Jr., Atlanta, Ga., Treas.
 
A Gregorian Congress has been called to meet under the auspices of Pope Pius X., in Strasburg. Germany, from August 16th to 19th. The congress is called for the purpose of carrying out the reform movement in church music contained in the encyclical of the new Pope, "Motu Proprio." As the American church has shown great reluctance in carrying out the regulations of the "plain chant," it has been earnestly requested to take part in this congress. It is understood by the church authorities here that the mandate of the Pope with regard to the substitution of the Plain Chant, instead of the operatic and elaborate music sung by mixed voices, must be obeyed within a short space of time.
 
HOME NOTES
A new string quartet by Sinding was played in Berlin recently.
 
Carl Goldmark, the veteran Austrian composer, celebrated his seventy-fifth birthday, May 18th.
 
The Biennial Meeting of the National Federation of Musical Clubs was held at Denver, June 6th-10th.
 
The New York State Music Teachers' Association met at Rochester, June 27th-29th, Jaroslaw de Zielinski, presiding.
 
Two new wonder children are reported from Budapest: Josef Szigeti, eleven years old, and Paul Horowitz, seven years old.
 
Giessen, Germany, with a population of less than 30,000, has voted nearly $100,000 for a town theatre and concert hall.
 
Only Roman Catholic singers are to be employed in the choirs of that church hereafter, according to the Pope's decree.
 
In the preliminary competition for "Roman Prize" at Paris, three women presented themselves among the nineteen candidates.
 
The French Society of Musicians has given six concerts at which compositions by modern French composers were programed.
 
A May Music Festival was given in Chicago, May 26th, under the direction of H. W. Fairbank ; the chorus numbered 1000 voices.
 
Of the entries for copyright at Washington, which numbered 106,577 during the year 1904, 23,740 were for musical compositions.
 
European correspondence says that the Pope intends to have a large hall in the Vatican to be devoted to the performance of oratorio.
 
The Minnesota State Music Teachers' Association met at Winona, June 7th-9th, under the presidency of David F. Colville, of St. Paul.
 
At a sale of old violins in London in May, $4500 was paid for a Guarnerius. The highest price previously paid at an auction was $4300.
 
A citizen of Vienna has presented to the Haydn Museum a large collection of Haydn relics, original manuscripts, letters and household objects.
 
The Twenty-third Annual Convention of the Ohio Music Teachers' Association, John S. Van Cleve, president, was held in Columbus, June 21st-23d.
 
The Easter and Ascension Festival of the Bach Choir of Bethlehem, Pa., was held June lst-3d. The chorus numbered 120 voices, the orchestra 70 players.
 
Mr. T. Brigham Bishop, writer of the war-songs "When Johnnie Comes Marching Home" and "John Brown's Body," died in Philadelphia, May 15th.
 
The violinist Henri Marteau, and the English pianist Frederic Lamond, have given very successful readings of Beethoven's violin sonatas in European cities lately.
 
A special section for music has been opened in the National Library at Florence; it will be in charge of Arnoldo Bonaventure, author of a well-known history of music.
 
The Philharmonic Society, of Warsaw, has been put on safe ground financially by a bequest from a lately deceased music lover, Mieczslaw Wessel, of a fine property valued at $750,000.
 
The contest for the best musical setting of the Ode to Col. W. C. P. Breckenridge, offered in Lexington, Ky., brought in a number of manuscripts which are now in the hands of the judges.
 
A course in "Piano Athletics" is announced to be given in the High School for Music in Mannheim, under the direction of A. Krizek, author of a book bearing the title given to the course.
 
A committee has been formed in Venice to publish hitherto inaccessible manuscripts, in the possession of libraries and societies, of works by Monteverde, Cavalli, Cesti, and the Gabrieli's.
 
The Illinois State Music Teachers' Association held its seventeenth convention at Peoria, June 6th-9th. The officers were Wm. F. Bentley, Galesburg, President; Florence French, Sec.-Treas., Chicago.
 
A revival of one of the mediaeval Mystery Plays is noted in Newcastle, England, when "Resurrexio Domini" was given. The scenery represented the chancel and transepts of an early Norman Church.
 
June is the month for meetings of music teachers' associations. The National Association, and the State organizations of New York, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Minnesota held meetings last month.
 
It looks as if there will be no Cincinnati May Music Festival in 1906, owing to trouble between the Association and the Chorus. It is to be hoped that the differences may be adjusted and work be resumed in the fall.
 
At a sale of old violins in London, in May, a 'cello by Andreas Guarnerius brought $250, a violin by Nicolo Amati, $490, one by Stainer, $300, a 'cello by Gagliano, $475, a violin by Stradivarius, dated 1723, $3750, a violin by Ruggeri, $600.
 
Here is a note of interest on music in Germany. An inventory of 87 typical German workmen's homes was taken in Dresden. Only 11 families owned some kind of musical instrument. Philadelphia would likely make a better showing than that.
 
The "Unione Magistrale Ligure" of Italy, announces an international competition for compositions for the mandolin with guitar or piano accompaniment. For particulars, apply to the Unione Magistrale Ligure, Stradone S. Agosti, No. 29, Genoa, Italy.
 
Mme. Lillian Blauvelt has signed a contract to sing in opera for six years. The first Work in which she is to appear is called "The Rose of the Alhambra," music by Lucius Hosmer; it is described as a romantic comic opera, scenes laid in Seville and Granada.
 
A musical institute will be held at the Waterloo, Iowa, Chautauqua, July 11th-August 2nd. Mr. Scott B. Prowell will have charge of the classes in Violin, Musical Theory, and Pedagogics; Mr. Hiram J. Lloyd, Singing and Conducting; Mr. F. W. Wimberly, Piano and History of Music.
 
The City of Nuremberg has made a grant of $3000 for music to the Philharmonic Orchestra of that city on condition that fifteen concerts be included in its season, at which the price of admission is to be 30 pfennige (8 cents). Two other orchestras receive money for free concerts.
 
The Annual May Music Festival of Yankton, S. D., was given May 21st-23d. The program consisted of an orchestra concert, a vocal recital by Gustaf Holmquist, of Chicago; and Gounod's oratorio, "The Redemption" by the Choral Union. The festival was directed by Mr. Lee N. Dailey.
 
Julius Kniese, director of the Wagner "Style" School at Bayreuth, died April 24th, at Dresden. He was connected with the Wagner movement at Bayreuth for more than twenty years. He was considered an authority on the interpretation of the Wagner dramas and coached many great singers.
 
Mr. Paul David, son of Ferdinand David, the great violinist who was Mendelssohn's ally in Leipzig, celebrated the fortieth anniversary of his professional activity in England, recently. Mr. David is the author of the article bearing on the violin and stringed instruments in Grove's Dictionary.
 
The Michigan State Music Teachers' Association met at Ann Arbor, June 14th-16th, in its nineteenth annual meeting, under the presidency of Mr. Charles S. Joslyn, of Lansing. The program consisted of addresses and recitals by members of the Association and artists from cities outside the State.
 
The Tenth Annual Meeting of the Missouri State Music Teachers' Association was held at Carthage, June 20th-23d. The president for 1904-1905 was Mr. T. Carl Whitmer; secretary, H. E. Rice. Up to the time of going to press The Etude had not received note of the names of the officers for 1905-1906.
 
A syndicate in Lyons, France, has guaranteed a revenue of $2000 a year for fifteen years for a series of symphony concerts in that city. It is the expectation that the choral organization of the "Schola Cantorim" (School for Singers) will join with the orchestra in the production of cantatas and oratorios.
 
A Chamber Music Festival was given at Bonn, May 28th-,June 1st. The Joachim Quartet, the pianists Busoni and Dohnanyi, the Society of Wind Instruments from the Paris Conservatory, and the "Society of Ancient Instruments," also of Paris, assisted. The latter organization played compositions of the 17th and 18th centuries.
 
The Theodore Spiering String Quartet of Chicago has been disbanded, as Mr. Spiering has arranged to go to Europe for a two-years' stay, concertizing and teaching, with Berlin as his headquarters. Some of his advanced pupils will go with him to continue their studies. Mr. William Diestel, of the Quartet, will take charge of a number of Mr. Spiering's pupils in Chicago.
 
Rimsky-Korsakov, the Russian composer, has been deprived of his position in the St. Petersburg Conservatoire to which he has been attached since 1871. He fell into disfavor because of his criticism of the bureaucratic cabal that controls Russia at present. This is a warning that no Government servant may discuss adversely the policy and doings of the Government. It must be remembered that the Conservatoire received a subvention from the Czar and is therefore amenable in discipline to the Government.
 
The ritual of the Holy Orthodox Church of Russia is imposing, the music is superb. The services are sung throughout to old plain chants, the contra bass voices taking the octave below the usual bass, give a rich fundamental bass character, the more striking because organs and other instruments are not used. It is related of Berlioz that when he attended a service in Moscow he was so affected by the singing that he could not stay in the cathedral lest he should shout. This choir consists of fifty men and boys.
 
The Georgia Music Teachers' Association met at the Brenau College Conservatory, Gainesville, Ga., under the presidency of Mr. J. D. MacLean, of Decatur. As the session was a joint one with the Southern Music Teachers' Association the programs were similar, with the exception of a recital of compositions by Dr. J. Lewis Browne, of Atlanta, and a general concert in which Mr. Charles Sheldon, Jr., Mr. R. D. Armour, and Mrs. W. L. Wilson, took part. The officers for 1905-1906 are August Geiger, Gainesville, Pres.; Miss M. Billingslea, Covington, V.-Pres.; Mrs. M. R. McClure, College Park, Sec.; Chas. Sheldon, Jr., Atlanta, Ga., Treas.
 
A Gregorian Congress has been called to meet under the auspices of Pope Pius X., in Strasburg. Germany, from August 16th to 19th. The congress is called for the purpose of carrying out the reform movement in church music contained in the encyclical of the new Pope, "Motu Proprio." As the American church has shown great reluctance in carrying out the regulations of the "plain chant," it has been earnestly requested to take part in this congress. It is understood by the church authorities here that the mandate of the Pope with regard to the substitution of the Plain Chant, instead of the operatic and elaborate music sung by mixed voices, must be obeyed within a short space of time.
 
HOME NOTES.
The Nashville Conservatory, C. J. Schubert, director, gave an interesting recital last month.
 
The choir of St. John's Episcopal Church, Jersey City, celebrated its 30th anniversary, May 26th. Mr. Benjamin Monteith is organist and choir-master.
 
The Music Department of Fredericksburg College, Va., Mr. F. A. Franklin, director, closed its school year on June 5th, with a concert, in which the college orchestra, 16 members, and the Choral Society, 30 members, assisted.
 
The Beloit Musical Association, Abram Ray Tyler, conductor, gave Dudley Buck's oratorio "The Light of Asia," May 19th.
 
The Marysville, O., Choral Union, assisted by the Plain City Choral Union, Dr. O. H. Evans, director, gave "The Creation," May 12th, at Marysville, and "Elijah," on the 13th. The Chicago Symphony Orchestra assisted.
 
A May Festival was given at Lima, Ind., by the High School Chorus under the direction of Miss Grace B. Hoff, May 12th.
 
The Treble Clef Club, of Portland, Me., gave a recital of "Spring" music, May 4th. The pupils wore spring flowers to represent the pieces played.
 
The Bozeman, Mon., Oratorio Society, Miss Josephine Cook, director, gave Haydn's "Creation," May 5th.
 
A piano recital was given by pupils of Leo Haendelman, New York City, at Aeolian Hall.
 
The Oratorio Chorus, of the University of Wooster, J. Lawrence Erb, conductor, gave Stainer's "Crucifixion," in April.
 
The commencement exercises of Rowe's Conservatory of Music, Ennis, Tex., were held May 25th.
 
A complimentary recital was given by pupils of the Henneman Vocal College, St. Louis, May 29th.
 
The commencement exercises of the Virginia College, Roanoke, Va., Erwin Schneider director of the musical department, were held May 29th.
 
The Sixth Commencement Concert of the American Violin School, Chicago, was given on June 5th.
 
Mr. George Murphy gave invitation song recitals by his pupils at Grand Rapids, May 31st and June 7th. Mr. Murphy will spend the summer in London in study.
 
The children of the Jo-Shipley Watson Piano School, Emporia, Kans., gave a story recital "Summer Scenes in Music Land," June 3d. The divisions of the program were: Morning, In the Garden, In the Village, In the Country, In Wonderland, Evening.
 
The Sioux City Choral Union, 200 voices, under the direction of Mr. Judson W. Mather, gave a Music Festival, May 22nd and 23d. "The Messiah" and "Stabat Mater" by Rossini, were the principal choral works. An artists' concert was given by the soloists and the Chicago Orchestra.
 
The Harmony Club of Chicago, Mr. D. A. Clippinger, conductor, gave Haydn's "Creation," May 26th.
 
The graduating exercises of the Tennessee Academy of Music, Nashville, were held June 5th; five pupils received diplomas, and seven certificates.
 
The twentieth commencement of the Western Conservatory, Chicago, was held June 2nd. Eight pupils were awarded diplomas, and eighteen certificates.
 
The recital of graduates of the music department of the Virginia Female Institute was given April 14th. There were three graduates.
 
The sixth annual music recital of the Atlanta University was given May 12th.
 
Mr. Homer N. Bartlett celebrated the twenty-sixth anniversary of his work as organist and choir-master of the Madison Avenue (N. Y. City) Baptist Church, in May. A handsome souvenir from the congregation was presented to Mr. Bartlett.
 
Mr. Wm. H. Pontius gave a series of recitals by his pupils at his Dubuque Studio, in May and June.
 
The graduating exercises of the Strassberger Conservatories of Music, St. Louis, were held June 11th. There were thirty-one graduates.
 
Mr. John Towers has accepted the position of director of the Vocal Department of the Kroeger School of Music, St. Louis.
 
A piano festival was given June 12th-14th under the direction of the Indianapolis Piano College, J. M. Dungan, director.
 
The graduating concerts of the Stephens College Music Department were held May 27th, May 29th, May 30th, the commencement exercises proper on May 31st. There were three graduates.
 
Edward Baxter Perry has finished his season of a hundred Lecture-Recitals and is settled at his summer home at Camden, Maine, preparing programs for the coming season and teaching a summer class of pupils from all parts of the country.
 
The season of 1904 and 1905 was a busy one for Wm. H. Sherwood, who has over 60 concert appearances to his credit this season. His May engagements included a number of festivals with the Theodore Thomas Orchestra.

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